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National conversations about policing and race continue in small-town Alaska – Alaska Public Media

National conversations about policing and race continue in small-town Alaska – Alaska Public Media

(Erin McKinstry/KCAW)

The national conversation around systemic bigotry and police violence against individuals of color has actually reached quite much every corner of the nation, including the small Southeast Alaska neighborhood of Sitka.

Sitkans have actually led demonstrations, a vigil and a march to raise awareness this month. They say they have both local and national issues.

” I do not feel like there is much questioning of racism in this town,” said Devan Parsly.

Parsly was one of about 14 individuals who stood in Sitka’s main roundabout earlier this month, wearing masks and holding signs. Another was filled with names of Black people eliminated by authorities across the country.

Parsly said she’s standing in uniformity with Sitka’s Black community and the national Black Lives Matter movement.

” So as a white-passing Native person, it’s important that I inform you that this movement here in Sitka is not for us. This motion is not lead by us,” she stated.

She stated she also has regional concerns around authorities violence and justice for Sitka’s Native neighborhood and around gentrification and bigotry in Sitka.

” Even just standing here every day, we see the true colors of numerous of the people,” she stated.

Parsly said many individuals didn’t recognize her because of her face mask. Some individuals driving by have actually flipped them off.

” We understand who they are, like they’re big prominent figures in this town. And it’s not all right,” she stated.

(Erin McKinstry/KCAW)

Seasonal employee Willie Wooten likewise attended the protest at the roundabout.

” Due to the fact that it’s real, people of color dying on the streets daily that are still getting shot by the authorities as we speak.

Over the last month, that discussion has actually been hashed out on the town’s Facebook group, Sitka Chatters. Sitka Cops Chief Robert Baty included his voice at an assembly meeting previously this month. He introduced himself utilizing his Tlingit name, Kaa Dat Aah.

” All of us understand of the horrific treatment of George Floyd, which has triggered nationwide outrage,” Baty said. “I am here tonight to spread a message that we as police understand the plight of our fellow people.”

Baty has actually worked as Sitka’s police chief for a little over a year and is a board member of the Alaska Association of Chiefs of Authorities. In a prepared statement that he checked out before assembly members, Baty noted the current national dialogue calling for cops department “defunding” and even straight-out abolishment.

” There’s been a motion for radical reform within law enforcement,” he said. “I can guarantee you that our practices are current, and we fulfill or exceed all legal requirements. We continually adapt our methods and methods to offer better services.”

RELATED: From Kotzebue to Ketchikan, Alaskans protested the killing of George Floyd, calling for justice

Baty took over the Sitka Authorities Department throughout a turbulent time.

The department also has a history of using excessive force. It came under fire in 2015 when a video appeared of police tasing then 18- year-old Mt. Edgecumbe High School student Franklin Hoogendorn more than 10 times. Hoogendorn is a person of the Native Town of Koyuk, beyond Nome. The occurrence prompted protest from the Sitka People of Alaska and an FBI examination into the department. Hoogendorn settled with the city in 2016 for $350,000, however Sitka confessed no fault in the incident.

Baty made big pledges when he took control of as police chief. He informed assembly members that in his first year leading the department he’s partnered on numerous jobs with the Sitka Tribe, developed a weekly officer training, and worked to represent Sitka’s diverse identities while attempting to develop neighborhood trust.

” You require to have confidence and trust in your authorities department,” he said.

Assembly members didn’t react to Baty’s statement, however throughout public remark, a couple of community members said Sitka’s authorities department still has a long way to go.

Demonstrator Louise Brady brought those concerns up at the roundabout too.

” My Tlingit name is Kh’ asheechtlaa, and I am Kiks.adi from the Point House here in Sitka. My people have been here 10,000 years,” she stated.

(Erin McKinstry/KCAW)

She stated that she has ongoing concerns with the Sitka Authorities Department. When Brady’s son was in high school, she said, she helped his friends, who were mostly Native, browse interactions with the local cops.

” Anytime, I would see a policeman … had actually stopped one of our young people, I would stop and leave my automobile and make sure that whatever was going on, they knew their rights and what they might and couldn’t do,” she said.

She said she ‘d like to see more local education around Alaska history and historical trauma. And she remains in contract with the “defund the cops” movement that advocates shifting funds from police departments toward social services, psychological healthcare and alcohol and drug treatment.

” Numerous of our people are jailed for substance abuse and other problems,” she said.

But with a department that’s already struggling for funds, it’s unclear where that money could come from.

RELATED: Have questions about police accountability and usage of force in Alaska? We have actually got some answers.

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